Andy Jurgis, www.rambles.net

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Scottish-Irish musician Rachel Hair is a superb player of the clarsach, the traditional Scottish harp, and this debut album is hugely welcome. In fact, it would be difficult to find another Celtic music debut album of such consistent quality and beauty. The 19 tunes over 11 tracks consist of seven Scottish and Irish traditional tunes, six of Rachel’s own compositions …

Debbie Koritsas, The Living Tradition

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Rachel Hair began to learn clarsach at age ten, and graduated with a first class degree from Strathclyde University, her final solo honours recital winning her a prize. With her family hailing from Scotland and Ireland, you begin to appreciate the album’s sub-title, ‘Scottish, Irish and original harp music’. Rachel’s original tunes include the lively, cheerful ‘Starry-Eyed Lads’ and ‘Charmed’, …

Geoff Wallis, The Irish Music Review

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Subtitled ‘Scottish, Irish and Original Harp Music’, Hubcaps & Potholes marks the recording debut of one of the most innovative young musicians to have emerged over the last few years. Of mixed Scots and Irish parents (her mother is from County Antrim), Rachel hails from Ullapool, up in the far northwest of Scotland and has already gained a deserved reputation …

Debbie Koritsas, Songlines

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The Lucky Smile is a sparkling recording centred around Rachel Hair’s pristine, beautifully detailed harp-playing, the tune selections by turns lively and emotionally expressive. The collection showcases the possibilities of this Celtic instrument in a thoroughly modern setting; Hair’s Starfish harp is surrounded on several tracks by acoustic guitar, double bass, drums and percussion, harmonium, Rhodes electric piano and fiddle, …

Musician magazine

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Talented Harpist Rachel gained numerous plaudits for her debut CD, ‘Hubcaps and Potholes’, and her second album – produced by Angus Lyon – looks set fair to build upon that success. Recorded in partnership with acoustic guitarist Paul Tracey and double bassist Andy Sharkey, the trio also perform here with singer Joy Dunlop, fiddler Graham McGeoch, percussionist Paul Jennings and …

Kenny Mathieson, The List

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Harpist Rachel Hair builds on her promising solo debut release, Hubcaps & Potholes, with this more expansive and subtly jazz-inflected disc. It is built around a basic trio featuring her harp, Andy Sharkey’s double bass and Paul Tracey’s guitar, with additional contributions from drummer Scott Mackay, percussionist Paul Jennings, producer Angus Lyon’s harmonium and Fender Rhodes, a solitary fiddle outing …

Delyth Jenkins, 
Taplas Magazine

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Following on from her assured and highly acclaimed debut, Hubcaps and Potholes, harpist Rachel Hair has now demonstrated a true coming of age. WIth much original material and some influences from Ireland, the Traditional music of Scotland is evident in terms of material and style, as in the pipe marches The Lochaber Gathering. Caution is sometimes needed when adding double …

Pete Fyfe,
 www.folkandroots.co.uk

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Rachel Hair has that uncanny knack of picking just the right tunes to take her audience on a spectacular acoustic musical tour. For instance the highly syncopated opening track ‘Back Home’ which, given a great jazz feel propelled by her accompanying musicians Paul Tracey (Guitar), Angus Lyons (Keyboards), Andy Sharkey (Double Bass) and Scott Mackay on drums brings her into …

Mike Wilson
, www.folking.com

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Rachel’s impressive debut album, Hubcaps & Potholes, explored the harp as a solo instrument, in a collection that showcased the instrument’s versatility, from its poised and delicate beauty, through to its enigmatic, expansive flourishes. For her second album, The Lucky Smile, Rachel showcases the harp, or clarsach as it is also known in her native Scotland, within a band setting, …

Bill Margeson
, www.liveireland.com

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Scotland is producing a bumper crop of innovative harpists lately, and another one is Rachel Hair. Unbelievably—after all, we ARE talking harp here—she has a style all her own that is very, very tasty. The girl can play, and she is solid to the ground. She knows her music, all right. If you like harp, you’ll love this! Welcome to …

Pete Fyfe, ukfolkmusic.co.uk

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One of my earliest experiences of performance harp was by ‘Harpo’ Marx in the film “A Day At The Races” and again in a film that the title escapes me. The only reason I mention this is at the way he exploited genres such as classical, folk and jazz to make the music accessible to the widest possible audience.Maybe the …

Neil King, Fatea

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When a trio is made up of three musicians you know to be capable of leading their own bands you do sometimes wonder at the wisdom of bringing them all together, then you hear an album like this and wonder if they weren’t touched by Athena. Rachel Hair, naturally, Jenn Butterworth and Euan Burton should be congratulated on the way …

Arperia Blog (english translation by Isabel Abal)

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We finally got around to listening to “No More Wings”, the new album from Scottish harpist Rachel Hair. An eagerly awaited album in which we had placed high hopes ever since we listened to her last project, “The Lucky Smile”. It has fulfilled all our expectations, confirming that Rachel and her trio project are no longer a promising sensation but …

Seán Laffey, The Irish Music Magazine

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Does the title of the album refer to breaking a Red Bull habit? Maybe, maybe not, the truth is the trio’s music is delivered with plenty of pep. Rachel’s trio includes herself on harp, Jenn Butterworth on guitar and vocals and Euan Burton on double bass. They keep it simple, lively and fun, add in guest musicians on a few …

Mike Wilson, Folk Radio UK

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Proving to be increasingly versatile and innovative, Rachel Hair returns with her third recording, this time placing the harp in the midst of a dynamic trio, featuring the double bass of Euan Burton, alongside the guitar and vocals of Jenn Butterworth. Even in this company, it is the shimmering character of the harp and the unequivocal passion of Rachel’s playing …

Allan Wilkinson, Northern Sky

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For her third album release, Glasgow-based harpist and composer Rachel Hair joins forces with her trio for the first time on record. NO MORE WINGS features a selection of sophisticated instrumental arrangements blending Scotland’s rich heritage of vibrant instrumental music with one or two songs beautifully sung here by singer/guitarist Jenn Butterworth including Cyril Tawney’s Grey Funnel Line, Jesse Winchester’s My Songbird as well …

Matthew Forss, Inside World Music

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Scottish group, Rachel Hair Trio, is a brilliant folk ensemble with a full-range of vocal melodies and instrumental delights. The music is inspired not only from Scotland, but Galicia, Brittany, Sweden, Wales, the USA, and other places with string and folk traditions. The eleven musical morsels are steeped with evocative harp, rhodes, accordion, sax, percussion, and jig-friendly guitar stylings with …

Songlines, Julian May

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The harpist Rachel Hair, weary of the angelic associations of her instrument, determine with her third album to reveal another side of its nature. Hence the title No More Wings, and this set of wicked tunes. They range widely – there are Breton ridees,  a Quebecois waltz and ‘Alastair m’annsachd’, a gorgeous slow air from the Captain Simon Fraser Collection, …